Tag Archives: Pass Efficiency

BYU vs Virginia – Statistical Extract


So here are the statistical highlights and (mostly) lowlights from the Virginia game:

  1. Jamaal Williams had 33 carries for 144 yards. The 33 carries were the most in the nation for week 1, the 144 yards ties him 12th in rushing yards.f
  2. Jamaal’s 33 carries were the most by a BYU running back since freshman Curtis Brown ran for 217 yards on 33 carries as part of rallying from 27 points down to defeat Utah State 35-34 in 2002.
  3. Ross Apo’s 52 yard reception on the last play of the game was his 2nd longest of his career. His longest was a 53 yarder vs Idaho in 2012.
  4. BYU and Virginia combined for 24 punts, which is the highest punt total in a game since at least 2001, which is as far back as the NCAA has published individual game statistics.
  5. BYU punted 11 times last weekend, but punted only 24 times for the ENTIRE SEASON in 1983.
  6. BYU had 23 3rd down attempts. Only 12 non-overtime games since 2005 have featured more 3rd down attempts — and only 2 of them involved teams that had the ball for less than 30 minutes.
  7. BYU completed only 13 of 40 passes (32.5% completion). In the last 12 years, only 5 other D1A teams have thrown at least 40 passes and completed less than 32.5% of them.
  8. Virginia only gained 223 yards on Saturday. Since Bronco resumed defensive coordinator duties in 2010, BYU has held 23 of their 33 opponents to under 300 yards of offense. They’ve lost 6 of those 23 games.
  9. Virginia had 223 yards of offense against BYU. Since 2001, 31 of 146 teams (21.2%) have won with between 220 and 225 yards of offense, but such teams only won 5 of 93 games against opponents that gained at least 350 yards. BYU finished with 360 yards of offense.
  10. Only 3 teams had fewer yards per offensive play than Virginia’s 3.01. BYU’s 3.89 yds/play was only better than 15 other teams.
  11. BYU’s pass efficiency of 72.5 was their 9th lowest since 2001, spanning 152 games. Their efficiency before the 52 yard clock-expiring heave to Apo was 60.8, which would have been their 6th lowest during that span.
  12. Since 2001, only 16.2% of NCAA teams have won with a pass efficiency between 70 and 75. BYU’s efficiency was 72.5.
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Pass Efficiency Differential Wins Championships


Yesterday’s blog touched on the importance of offensive pass efficiency and its effect on wins and losses.  The power of the pass efficiency statistic is increased by taking the difference between a team’s offensive and defensive pass efficiency.  This is called the Pass Efficiency Differential (PED).  The top 6 teams in this week’s AP Top 25 are all in the top 10 nationally in PED.

AP Rank Team PED Rank
1 LSU 4
2 Oklahoma St. 10
3 Stanford 8
4 Alabama 6
5 Boise St. 2
6 Oregon 9

 

This is far from a fluky result. Note the PED rankings of the national champions since 2000.

Season Champion PED Rank
2000 Oklahoma 6
2001 Miami (FL) 2
2002 Ohio State 12
2003 LSU 3
2004 USC 4
2005 Texas 1
2006 Florida 6
2007 LSU 8
2008 Florida 2
2009 Alabama 5
2010 Auburn 7
Average 5.1

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Pass Efficiency: The Key To Victory


Pass efficiency is an enigmatic formula that tries to combine various statistical measures into a meaningful whole. The formula is:

Pass Efficiency = Completion% + (8.4 * YdsPerAttempt) + (330 * TDsPerAttempt) – (200 * INTsPerAttempt)

On average, completion percentage and yards per attempt account for 93% of the total pass efficiency measure.  If teams can maximize these aspects of their passing game, they will win a very high percentage of the time.  For example, since 2001, BYU is 51-2 in games where they completed at least 62% of their passes and averaged at least 7.4 yards per attempt, as shown below:

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